About Gaelle Connolly

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So far Gaelle Connolly has created 5 blog entries.
26 06, 2020

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

2020-06-26T15:36:01+00:00

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

St Olav Waterway Map

The Saint Olav Waterway is an unusual pilgrimage: largely taken by sea, across the mouth of the Gulf of Bothnia which id scattered with hundreds of islands, large and small. The Waterway links up small communities on islands and remote headlands that are dependent on a special kind of tourist: one that is keen to get away from the crowds and looking for a spectacular natural environment.

Pilgrims can follow the route in many different ways. Those on foot or by bicycle follow the marked trails wherever there is dry land; otherwise hopping from island to island by boat or ferry. The more nautical can sail the whole way. For much of the trail, a kayak is an excellent means of transport, including through the Archipelago National Park.

The initial goal has been to mark and map the 625 km route from Turku in Finland to Söderhamn in Sweden – which represents the first half of the 1200 km pilgrimage route from the Cathedral of Turku to that of Trondheim in Norway, the burial site of the Viking king Saint Olav. Blazing of the trail has been completed on the Finnish side, but was temporarily slowed by Covid-19 on the Swedish shore.

For more information: https://stolavwaterway.com/en/

AUTHOR

Written by David Ward-Perkins.

OTHER ARTICLES

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

June 26th, 2020|

Ladakh women’s trekking company

June 18th, 2020|

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

June 12th, 2020|

Őrség National Park (Hungary)

June 10th, 2020|

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

February 19th, 2020|

Cruising in the Arctic

August 23rd, 2019|

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support 2020-06-26T15:36:01+00:00
18 06, 2020

Ladakh women’s trekking company

2020-06-18T14:57:15+00:00

Ladakh women’s trekking company

Ladakh women’s trekking company

This small local enterprise challenges gender stereotypes, demonstrating how women can successfully be entrepreneurs in a tourism field traditionally dominated by men.   

The Ladakhi Women Travel Company LWTC is a travel agency based in the Himalayan town of Leh, in northern India, owned and operated by Ladakhi women. Local guide Thinlas Chorol founded the LWTC in 2009 to give women in Ladakh the opportunity to participate in the traditionally male-dominated areas of trekking and mountain climbing.  

By working as trekking guides, these women are challenging gender stereotypes in Ladakh, where a woman is expected to conform to traditional Ladakhi notions of obedience and discipline. Early days were difficult, but the LWTC has become a confident and well-trained group of female professionals. 

The treks are entirely organized by the women of LWTC, acting as guides, porters and cooks as well as providing end-to-end customer service and advice. The company has established a reputation for quality and is building a loyal clientele, in particular among women hikers, for whom the LWTC represents security and the assurance their needs and priorities will be taken into account.

AUTHOR

Written by David Ward-Perkins.

OTHER ARTICLES

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

June 26th, 2020|

Ladakh women’s trekking company

June 18th, 2020|

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

June 12th, 2020|

Őrség National Park (Hungary)

June 10th, 2020|

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

February 19th, 2020|

Cruising in the Arctic

August 23rd, 2019|

Ladakh women’s trekking company 2020-06-18T14:57:15+00:00
12 06, 2020

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

2020-06-12T12:42:49+00:00

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

Orseg National Park, Hungary

For some weeks or months, tourism professionals have been confined to their homes. Many have been rethinking how their destinations or businesses might operate differently in the coming months and years.

From this forced introspection, we are seeing an outpouring of innovative ideas. We are also seeing a return to powerful and creative ideas from the past, that were once considered marginal but may now be influential in reshaping tourism.

Over the coming months, Innovation in Tourism will be selecting examples that can be an inspiration for the new world of tourism, whether they come from the present or the past.

The members of the Innovation in Tourism LinkedIn group are all senior professionals of tourism with many years’ experience (https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12073329/). We invite them to contribute their own examples of how the world of tourism might evolve.

AUTHOR

Written by David Ward-Perkins.

OTHER ARTICLES

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

June 26th, 2020|

Ladakh women’s trekking company

June 18th, 2020|

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

June 12th, 2020|

Őrség National Park (Hungary)

June 10th, 2020|

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

February 19th, 2020|

Cruising in the Arctic

August 23rd, 2019|

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch 2020-06-12T12:42:49+00:00
19 02, 2020

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

2020-06-07T16:16:34+00:00

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

Lake Ohrid

This new book from CABI plunges into the world of ‘extended’ tourism, offering an exploration of the ‘routes’ phenomenon whereby tourism is no longer for a given destination, but extends over multiple sites, a territory or landscape.  Covering how routes and trails are created, often as ways of clustering experiences, it also reviews their effects on tourism businesses, local populations and other stakeholders. Emphasising the critical role of local communities, volunteers and small businesses, as well as those who provide strategic direction and funding, the book: 

  • Is based in tourism theory, but focuses on practical issues in the development of routes and trails;
  • Includes a rich selection of contemporary examples and cases, showing the reader best practice as well as illustrating challenges and risks;
  • Covers both strategic issues of concern to nations, regions and local authorities, and the complex dynamics occurring on the ground, such as the role of grass-roots organisations and local communities.

Routes and trails allow destinations to diversify their offer and spread the economic and social benefits of tourism. With tourist behaviour increasingly shifting to thematic experiences, this book shows how to create these in a way that is both meaningful for visitors and beneficial for the destination. Suitable for tourism policy makers, economic development agencies and local stakeholders, it is also a vital resource for the next generation; students of tourism, sociology, local politics and economic development.

AUTHOR

David Ward-Perkins, Christina Beckmann and Jackie Ellis.

OTHER ARTICLES

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

June 26th, 2020|

Ladakh women’s trekking company

June 18th, 2020|

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

June 12th, 2020|

Őrség National Park (Hungary)

June 10th, 2020|

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

February 19th, 2020|

Cruising in the Arctic

August 23rd, 2019|

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice 2020-06-07T16:16:34+00:00
23 08, 2019

Cruising in the Arctic

2020-06-07T16:15:23+00:00

Cruising in the Arctic

Lake Ohrid

For cruise operators and yacht owners, the progressive retreat of polar ice due to global warming is an invitation to venture ever further north, including to once-remote locations such as the island of Svalbard, northern Greenland or the Baffin sea. These destinations are extremely sensitive, both in terms of potential ecological damage and impact on local communities. The environmental damage is compounded by the poor practices of many cruise operators in terms CO2 emissions and waste management.

As always, tourism in the Arctic acts as a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it has the potential to cause irreparable damage to the environment and to the social fabric of local communities. On the other hand, sustainable forms of tourism can serve to protect these territories from unbridled industrial development, in the form of unsupervised mining practices. Properly managed, it can raise awareness of environmental issues among stakeholders and serve as a catalyst for protective measure, such as the creation of national or regional parks.

These issues were recently raised at a meeting organized in Helsinki as part of the joint programme of the Belmont Forum and BiodivERsA, to develop scenarios of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Discussions around tourism and biodiversity were largely led by David Ward-Perkins of TEAM and Ilja Leo Lang of the Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators (AECO), an international association whose members operate in marine areas and territories beyond 60 degrees north latitude including Svalbard, Jan Mayen, Greenland, Arctic Canada, the Russian Arctic National Park and Iceland.

Meanwhile, legislation to restrict and monitor cruising and yachting practices at an international level is critical, but is slow in coming. The vacuum is being partly filled by AECO, whose members follow an extensive set of guidelines and set standards for the industry.

In September 2019, a workshop is being held in Longyearbyen, Svalbard, organized by AECO, the Norwegian Institute of Nature Research (NINA) and Visit Svalbard. It will assemble organisations keen to shape research questions that can contribute to knowledge-based management of tourism in Svalbard and similarly sensitive areas. The workshop is aimed at researchers from a broad range of fields, including the social sciences, economics, natural sciences, business and tourism. The purpose is to identify projects, priorities and strategies that can serve to find the optimal balance for sustainable tourism development in fragile areas..

AUTHOR

Written by David Ward-Perkins, with contribution from Ilja Leo Lang, Assistant Director of AECO, Association of Arctic Expedition Cruise Operators.

OTHER ARTICLES

A sea-borne pilgrimage route that has been winning strong community support

June 26th, 2020|

Ladakh women’s trekking company

June 18th, 2020|

Innovation in Tourism: a relaunch

June 12th, 2020|

Őrség National Park (Hungary)

June 10th, 2020|

Tourism Routes and Trails: Theory and Practice

February 19th, 2020|

Cruising in the Arctic

August 23rd, 2019|

Cruising in the Arctic 2020-06-07T16:15:23+00:00